Review: The Fringe Festival

So one of the advantages to going to Edinburgh in August is that the city becomes host to the Fringe Festival. And I do mean the entire city — half the parks are transformed into theaters, every surface is covered with flyers, and it seems like every little bar becomes a venue.

I managed to catch quite a lot while I was there (most of the shows are short), so I’ll give some brief selected reviews below.

Continue reading

Advertisements

ATP: Edinburgh

I’ve done a fair bit of traveling recently. Not as much as I would have liked to, but while Ryanair is a boon to poor students everywhere, traveling is still kinda expensive and I’m on a budget.

That said, I’ve gotten to see some interesting places. Florence, Athens, Istanbul; Dublin, Belfast, and soon Paris. But as much as I enjoyed seeing all those beautiful cities, there’s no place like home. However unfair it may be, deep down, I measure all those places against New York and find them a little bit wanting.

There’s only one city that’s managed to capture my heart in quite the same way, and that’s Edinburgh. Continue reading

10,000 Steps

Along with the (relatively) recent popularity of health/fitness trackers like Fitbit and Jawbone has come the general advice that one should try to walk 10,000 steps a day. (That’s about 5 miles, or 1 hr 30 mins of walking at my pace).

Given that I’m not taking ballet class regularly at the moment (during the year it was too expensive to take more than one class a week, when I was used to it being free, and now that the academic year is over the classes have stopped), I’ve been trying to work 10,000 steps into my daily routine.

Let me tell you: it’s been great. Continue reading

The Mirror of Fiction

If you’ll indulge me, dear readers, I’d like to ramble a little bit about representation in fiction.

I’m not going to dive too deeply into an analysis of why representation is a good thing; that’s been done before and better by other people — and regardless, it should be intuitively understood that seeing yourself reflected in the culture you consume is validating, normalizing, comforting. That privilege has too long belonged mostly to young-to-middle-aged cis white men, and so any deviation from that “norm” (which is, in the context of the diversity of the real world, not normal at all) is to be celebrated.

I also don’t want to dwell on representation done badly, and all the harm that can do. I’ve argued about it too much recently, what with J.K. Rowling’s latest foray into Native American mythology.

What I want to do instead is to highlight a couple of books I’ve read recently that have done a good job of representing the sort of people who are traditionally ignored or elided in fiction — because the sense of relief when you can finally see yourself on the page, know that you aren’t alone in feeling the way you do or being the way you are, is immeasurable, and if I can help others to feel that, I should.

So with that said, three books read recently where I noted a particular attention to diversity in representation: Continue reading

ATP: A Wildlife Guide to Pembroke & Environs

As a native New Yorker, “wildlife” to me means rats, pigeons, cockroaches, and maybe the occasional raccoon. One of the nice things about England has been getting to see some different animals…

Wood Pigeons

These delight me. I don’t know what it is about their enormous, chubby bodies that always makes me smile. They’re quire prettily feathered for a pigeon, too. All my friends here think it’s weird that I find them so interesting, but then again they don’t know what it’s like to grow up surrounded by city pigeons. (And when my dad came to visit, he agreed that they are really big).

Pheasants

I’ve only seen pheasants a handful of times — once out behind Queen’s College, once at the Botanical Garden, maybe once or twice more — but they’ve made a strong impression on me. I think it’s probably because of that Roald Dahl story, plus the association with game hunting, which I think of as quintessentially ye old English. Continue reading

Review: The Royal Ballet in Frankenstein (5/17/16)

The Royal Ballet has done it again, putting on a smashing (and brand new) production of Liam Scarlett’s Frankenstein.

I basically have nothing bad to say about it. The dancing was good from everyone, from the corps de ballet up to the principals. Particular commendation to Steven McRae (The Creature) for a truly phenomenal solo in Act II. The children in the production were quite charming and obviously well trained; Guillem Cabrera Espinach (William) was very cute and did well keeping up with the adults he was dancing with. Continue reading

The Podcast Post (Redux)

It’s been a while since the last podcast post, so let’s revisit the subject. First we’ll see which podcasts have stood the test of time, and which new additions have filled out my repertoire.

Looking Back

What podcasts did I mention last time? Am I still listening to them?

  • The SF Signal PodcastStill listening to this one — not every episode, but I keep an eye out for interviews or topics that look interesting. However, now that SF Signal is shutting down, I anticipate that the podcast will stop as well.
  • Writing ExcusesStill short, still sweet, still listening.
  • SF SqueecastUnfortunately is on (possibly permanent) hiatus.
  • Welcome to Night ValeI can’t, I’m sorry. This one is just not grabbing me. I gave their other project “Alice Isn’t Dead” a try as well, and similarly it’s just not for me.
  • Tea and JeopardyJust as lovely and as British as ever 🙂
  • Galactic SuburbiaStill as excellent as when I first started listening. Alisa, Alex and Tansy have really interesting and insightful things to say, and we have very similar tastes in books!
  • The Thrilling Adventure HourStill in love! Although as part of my recent change in life philosophies, I’ve allowed myself to stop listening to the segments that I don’t enjoy as much. Which means, essentially, that I’m listening to “Beyond Belief”, “Sparks Nevada”, and “Down in Moonshine Holler”, though that last may not be a permanent keeper. We’ll see.

Looking Forward

What new podcasts have I picked up?

  • Breaking the Glass Slipper: A podcast about women in SF, Fantasy, and Horror. There have only been two episodes so far, but it seems very promising. And certainly a subject matter I’m invested in!
  • Fangirl Happy Hour: A podcast very much in a similar vein to “Galactic Suburbia”, though it has more cursing in it. Also enjoyable to listen to, and a good source of recommendations.
  • The West Wing Weekly: GUYS. You don’t understand. I love this show so much. This is an episode-by-episode discussion of the West Wing, with your hosts Hrishikesh Hirway and JOSHUA MALINA he was on the show for real, guys, I can’t. With insightful discussion of episodes and lots of guest appearances from interesting people (actors, writers, costume designers etc.) involved with the show.

And You?

Any interesting podcasts on your radar? I’m always open to recommendations!